New York

  • State Data Overview

    Across New York, there is a shortage of rental homes affordable and available to extremely low income households (ELI), whose incomes are at or below the poverty guideline or 30% of their area median income (AMI). Many of these households are severely cost burdened, spending more than half of their income on housing. Severely cost burdened poor households are more likely than other renters to sacrifice other necessities like healthy food and healthcare to pay the rent, and to experience unstable housing situations like evictions

    K
    e
    y
    F
    a
    c
    t
    s
    959,659
    Or
    28%
    Renter households that are extremely low income
    $25,180
    Maximum income for 4-person extremely low income household (state level)
    -612,854
    Shortage of rental homes affordable and available for extremely low income renters
    $63,976
    Annual household income needed to afford a two-bedroom rental home at HUD's Fair Market Rent.
    70%
    Percent of extremely low income renter households with severe cost burden
  • State Level Partners

    NLIHC Housing Advocacy Organizer

    Tori Bourret

    Tori Bourret

    202.662.1530 x244 | [email protected]

    State Partners

    Coalition for the Homeless
    129 Fulton Street
    New York, NY 10038
    P (212) 776-2000
    F (212) 964-1303
    www.coalitionforthehomeless.org
    Shelly Nortz, Deputy Executive Director for Policy
    [email protected]
    Giselle Routhier, Policy Director
    [email protected]

    Neighborhood Preservation Coalition of New York State
    126 State Street
    Suite 302 
    Albany, NY 12207
    P 518-432-6757
    F 518-432-6758
    www.npcnys.org
    Mark Streb, Executive Director
    [email protected]

    New York State Rural Housing Coalition
    79 North Pearl Street
    3rd Floor
    Albany, NY 12207
    P 518-458-8696
    F 518-458-8896
    www.ruralhousing.org
    Colin McKnight, Acting Executive Director
    [email protected]

    Tenants and Neighbors
    255 West 36th Street
    Suite 505
    New York, NY 10018
    P 212-608-4320
    F 212-619-7476
    www.tandn.org
    Yolande Cadore, Acting Executive Director
    [email protected]

    Supportive Housing Network of New York
    247 West 37th Street
    18th floor
    New York, NY 10018
    P 646-619-9640 (New York City Office)
    P 518-465-3233
    www.shnny.org
    Laura Mascuch, Executive Director
    [email protected]
    Stephen Piasecki, Upstate Members Services Coordinator
    [email protected]

    New York Housing Conference
    247 West 37th Street
    4th Floor
    New York, NY 10018
    P: 646-923-8548
    https://thenyhc.org/
    Rachel Fee, Executive Director
    [email protected]
    Jessica Facciponti, Director of Policy and Programs
    [email protected]
    Brendan Cheney, Director of Policy and Communications
    [email protected]

    Become an NLIHC State Partner

    NLIHC’s affiliation with our state coalition partners is central to our advocacy efforts. Although our partners' involvement varies, they are all housing and homeless advocacy organizations engaged at the state and federal level. Many are traditional coalitions with a range of members; others are local organizations that serve more informally as NLIHC's point of contact.

    Inquire about becoming a state partner by contacting [email protected]

    Become a Member
  • Housing Trust Fund
    HTF Implementation Information

    NLIHC continues working with leaders in each state and the District of Columbia who will mobilize advocates in support of HTF allocation plans that benefit ELI renters to the greatest extent possible. Please contact the point person coordinating with NLIHC in your state (below) to find out about the public participation process and how you can be involved. Email Tori Bourret with any questions.

    NHTF logo
    Current Year HTF Allocation
    NLIHC Point Person for HTF Advocacy

    Steve Piasecki    

    Upstate Member Services Coordinator

    Supportive Housing Network of New York

    518-465-3233

    [email protected]

    State Designated Entity:

    RuthAnne Visnauskas

    NYS Homes & Community Renewal

    Commissioner/CEO

    New York State Housing Finance Agency

    212-872-0309

    [email protected]

    Official Directly Involved with HTF Implementation:

    Jason Pearson

    Vice President, Multifamily Initiatives

    212-872-0470

    [email protected]


    State Entity Webpage

    Housing Finance Agency


    NHTF-specific page

    2018 Multifamily Open Window Materials

  • Resources
    Resources

    Housing Profiles

    State Housing Profile

    State Housing Profile: New York (PDF)

    Congressional District Housing Profile

    Congressional District Profile: New York (PDF)

    Research and Data

    National Housing Preservation Database

    The National Housing Preservation Database is an address-level inventory of federally assisted rental housing in the United States.

    Out of Reach: The High Cost of Housing

    Out of Reach documents the gap between renters’ wages and the cost of rental housing. In New York and Nationwide

    The Gap: A Shortage of Affordable Rental Homes

    The Gap represents data on the affordable housing supply and housing cost burdens at the national, state, and metropolitan levels. In New York and Nationwide

  • Take Action
    Tell Congress to Protect and Expand the National Housing Trust Fund
    Urge Congress to Pass a Budget with Strong Support for Affordable Housing Programs
    Tell Congress that Opportunity Zones Must Benefit Low Income People and Long-Term Residents
  • COVID-19 Resources
    COVID-19 Resources

    NLIHC has estimated a need for no less than $100 billion in emergency rental assistance and broke down the need and cost for each state (download Excel spreadsheet). 

    Many cities and states are establishing rental assistance programs to support individuals and families impacted by COVID-19. This tracker links to news reports of various city, state and philanthropic rental assistance programs that are being established during the pandemic. Check NLIHC's cumulative list of rental assistance.


    A10255 Establishes a COVID-19 emergency small landlord assistance fund; provides that local housing authorities shall provide assistance to owners of a real property portfolio whose tenants have had their rent payments suspended for the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of such properties. https://tinyurl.com/y9wq5v6g

    SB8140 Establishes a COVID-19 emergency rental assistance program; implements a program of rental assistance in the form of emergency vouchers for eligible individuals or families; defines terms. Pending. https://tinyurl.com/y87fk3pf and https://tinyurl.com/y85dtjc7

    CityDescriptionSource
    RochesterMayor Lovely Warren expanded access to Financial Empowerment Centers to assist residents in dealing with personal finance challenges. She also announced a number of grant and loan programs for small businesses and residents. https://tinyurl.com/y7qx4to3

    Across the country, homeless service providers are struggling to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. In order to follow public health guidelines and help ensure people’s safety, some shelters are being forced to reduce services, restrict admittance, or close entirely. The loss of these critical resources puts people experiencing homelessness at even higher risk of illness. Check NLIHC's cumulative list of shelter closings.

    Below is a list of shelters that have had to majorly alter services or completely close:


    Lockport CARES, a faith-based agency with 19 beds, has stopped admitting new clients.

    Advocates report that an all-volunteer shelter in Buffalo with 29 beds closed in late March since volunteers are mostly older and couldn't risk being exposed to the virus. Advocates also report other shelters are limiting the number people and reducing hours.

    Bethany House in Rochester, a women’s shelter, is closing on Wednesday, March 25.

    Rachel Fee, executive director of the New York Housing Conference, an NLIHC state partner, penned an opinion piece in City Limits arguing that New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s proposal to cut the city’s housing budget by 40% is shortsighted. 

    New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is thwarting efforts to move everyone experiencing homelessness into hotel rooms amid the pandemic. Advocates are concerned that the city’s delay could increase hospitalizations or death among people residing in congregate shelters. Read more in Politico

    An editorial in the Buffalo News discusses the need to protect both tenants and landlords. COVID-19 has created a conflict between tenants who are now unable to pay their rent and landlords who may desperately rely on rental income.


    ABC News reported that according to the nonprofit Win, more than 325,000 of New York City’s lowest-income households, nearly 1 million people, are at risk of severe income loss and being unable to pay rent. President and CEO of Win Christine Quinn implored that without intervention, such as housing vouchers and additional hotel rooms, millions of people will become homeless after the eviction moratorium is lifted. 

    New York City’s largest provider of shelter and services for mothers experiencing homelessness and their children, Win, released a housing stability and recovery plan: The Aftermath Plan: Responding to Homelessness in the Wake of COVID-19. The plan consists of five policy priorities to prevent housing instability for the most vulnerable families.

    Advocates are criticizing the de Blasio administration’s decision to transport people experiencing homelessness who were staying on the subway trains to congregate shelters. The Department of Homeless services chose to move people experiencing homelessness to one of the city’s most crowded shelters. Giselle Routhier, policy director for the Coalition for the Homeless, an NLIHC state partner, said that her organization is urging Mayor de Blasio to move these individuals to vacant hotel rooms across the city.

    New York housing advocates are concerned that the state’s share of HUD relief funds falls short of its share of national coronavirus cases. Rachel Fee, executive director of the New York Housing Conference, an NLIHC state partner, noted that Florida received nearly the same amount of block grant funding, while having just 12% of coronavirus cases.
    The Washington Post published an article discussing New York City’s COVID-19 Hotel Program, which provides free hotel rooms to eligible New Yorkers with mild COVID-19 cases. It also mentions that the hotel program includes protections and accommodations for people experiencing homelessness.

    Governor Cuomo extended the statewide moratorium on evictions through August 20. The moratorium was set to expire June 20. The governor said that he will reassess the situation once the end of August comes around.

    The New York Police Department deployed 1000 police officers to remove people experiencing homelessness from the city’s subway system as the train cars and platforms are disinfected.  

    Uncovered letters from FEMA reveal that the de Blasio administration received federal approval in late March to acquire hotel rooms for people experiencing homelessness, raising questions about the city’s recent announcement that it needs more time to acquire a method of reimbursement to expand its hotel program.


    New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is opposing legislation introduced by the city council that would offer all people experiencing homelessness – 12,000 people in total – the option to stay in the 100,000 vacant private hotel rooms across the city. While de Blasio’s administration argues that the city does not have the funds to afford this, FEMA could likely cover the cost of the program.

    Governor Andrew Cuomo said that the subway shutdown to clean the trains offers an opportunity to engage with people experiencing homelessness who have been using the subway as shelter.

    Vijay Dandapani, president of the Hotel Association of New York City, said that city hotels are ready and willing to help house people experiencing homelessness during the pandemic. The city cites health and safety concerns as justification for why it has not expanded its current hotel program. Giselle Routhier, policy director for Coalition for the Homeless, an NLIHC state partner, stated that the city’s delay in housing unsheltered residents in hotels is due to a lack of will.  

    Governor Andrew Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that the state and city will halt subway service between 1 and 5am each night to disinfect every train every 24 hours. Homeless advocates expressed concern that people experiencing homelessness who had been staying in subway stations will have nowhere to go.

    Mayor Bill de Blasio announced plans to move as many as 1,000 New Yorkers experiencing homelessness every week from shelters into hotels across the city during the pandemic. As of April 28, 775 New Yorkers experiencing homelessness tested positive for COVID-19. 

    Governor Andrew Cuomo referred to the increasing number of people experiencing homelessness staying on New York City subways as “disgusting” and “disrespectful” to essential workers who rely on the subway to get to work.

    The Westchester County Department of Social Services reported that it had isolated and monitored 50 COVID-19-positive people experiencing homelessness. The department also said that across Westchester, 75% of its 987 operating shelters, drop-in shelters, and emergency housing units were filled.

    VA New York Harbor Healthcare System providers are conducting street outreach and shelter visits to ensure that at-risk veterans experiencing homelessness have access to health support.

    The New York City health department began delivering methadone to homeless shelter residents and discharged hospital patients. Under normal circumstances, home delivery of methadone - a controlled substance - is prohibited. Door-to-door delivery of methadone is intended to stem the spread of COVID-19.


    New York City’s Department of Homeless Services reported that 51 people using its services have died due to COVID-19. The coronavirus has spread to more than a third of the city’s 450 shelters.

    The New York City Council introduced a virus relief package that included measures to protect tenants and people experiencing homelessness. The legislation would prohibit the collection of debts or evicting tenants impacted by COVID-19 until next April. Another bill included in the relief package would require the city to provide single adults experiencing homelessness with private rooms until the pandemic ends. The City Council also voted on measures to create and preserve over 2,000 units of affordable housing.

    New York City fell short of its goal of moving 2,500 people experiencing homelessness to hotel rooms by April 20. The Department of Homeless Services has moved approximately 1,050 people experiencing homelessness into hotel rooms since the onset of COVID-19. The agency is aware of 617 positive COVID-19 cases among people in shelters or lacking stable housing, and as of Monday, 43 people had died.

    Four people experiencing homelessness in New York who are staying in hotel rooms crowdfunded through the “Homeless Can’t Stay Home” campaign shared their experiences with The City.

    More than 500 New York-based doctors, nurses, and social workers sent a letter to city officials, including Mayor Bill de Blasio and Governor Andrew Cuomo urging the city to take immediate actions to protect people experiencing homelessness. As of Thursday, 537 homeless people had tested positive for COVID-19, and 33 have died. Read the letter here.

    New York’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) requested that developers of nearly completed affordable housing projects increase the number of apartments allocated for people experiencing homelessness. While this would not be a legal requirement, HPD would use city rental voucher money to pay for the units allocated for the people who were formerly homeless.

    The Coalition for the Homeless and allies continue to urge elected officials to protect homeless New Yorkers during COVID-19. The number of single adults in New York City’s homeless shelter system reached a record high last week. According to the Coalition for the Homeless, nearly 17,700 single men and women slept in shelters last Thursday.

    New York City Housing Authority’s 2,200 densely populated buildings are being challenged to contain the outbreak of COVID-19. For example, already in deep need of maintenance and repairs, many of the buildings are not being regularly cleaned or disinfected. 
     
    Michael Che, a Saturday Night Live comedian, shared an open letter revealing that he lost his grandmother to complications from COVID-19 — and today he announced that, in her honor, he will be paying the rent for all the units her New York City Housing Authority building (NYCHA) for a month. “It’s crazy to me that residents of public housing are still expected to pay their rent when so many New Yorkers can’t even work.” 

    New York was granted a major disaster declaration this week by President Trump. However, FEMA has not yet responded to questions regarding whether individual assistance or disaster unemployment programs will be offered.

    An Albany Housing Authority employee tested positive for COVID-19 the public housing property where the employee resided is now under quarantine.

    An op-ed in City Limits by Judi Kende of DHRC-member Enterprise Community Partners, calls for New York to quickly move to create a housing voucher system to combat homelessness.

    Over 99 people living in New York City’s homeless shelters have tested positive for COVID-19. The current situation is the result of years of underfunding by the state and city government.

    NY1 covered the story of a NYC couple living in their car with COVID-19.

    New York lawmakers seek to prevent evictions through new legislation that would extend a statewide moratorium on evictions.
     
    Advocates urge NYC to house homeless in hotels during COVID pandemic.

    New York City

    Residents at NYC homeless shelters are becoming concerned about the cleanliness of shelters in the city, worrying that the lack of sanitation may spread the virus.

    With up to 20 individuals living in the same room, residents of NYC’s congregate shelters face a high risk of infection.

    In the meantime, the City of New York is posting notices to homeless encampments warning of them to vacate the premises or lose their belongings. The CDC directly advises against such “street sweeps” during the pandemic.

    The coronavirus is wreaking havoc on New York City's public housing system, where the NYC housing authority oversees roughly 174,000 apartments. Many public housing tenants have multiple chronic conditions and lack a primary care physician making them at risk for COVID-19. 

    Residents at a city homeless shelter on Randall’s Island are concerned over what they say are unsanitary living conditions putting residents at for COVID-19. Former resident Alfonzo Forney, 41, is circulating a petition signed by dozens who live in the shelter demanding new management.

    New York City homeless advocates have called on Mayor Bill de Blasio to house homeless individuals in the city’s more than 100,000 empty hotel rooms

    There are stark differences in COVID infection rates in New York City based on education and race. New analysis by researchers at New York University's Furman Center found that strongest neighborhood factors linked to high COVID-19 rates were having a large share of black and Hispanic residents; having a high proportion of overcrowded apartments and having a large share of residents without college degrees.

    New York City has released interim guidance for homeless shelters in the area. The document aims to help shelters prevent the spread of COVID-19 and prepare for an outbreak if it were to occur. 

    COVID-19 Resources Other

    National Media

    What to Know About Housing and Rent During the COVID-19 Emergency? https://tinyurl.com/y74ox85d

    Arbor Realty Trust launched an innovative $2 million rental assistance program to help thousands of tenants and families significantly impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak. Arbor is contributing $1 million to the program and participating borrowers will match Arbor's advances to its tenants in need to help fill the rent gap during the hard-hit months of May and June. Together, the partnership program will provide $2 million in relief. https://tinyurl.com/y9r6x9vb