The Congressional District Housing Profiles prepare NLIHC members and others for informed, data-driven housing advocacy. Each profile pulls from a variety of sources and illuminates several dimensions of housing affordability for renter households in each district, the surrounding area, and the state. The profiles are updated throughout the year as new data become available. Last update: February 2016

Each profile is divided into three sections:

1.    District-Level Renter StatisticsThis section includes information on the number and percent of renter households with severe housing cost burden, classified by the following HUD defined income limits: extremely low income (0-30% of Area Median Income), very low income (31-50% of AMI), and low income (51%-80% of AMI). This section also provides data on the absolute surplus or deficit of units affordable to renter households by income level, as well as units that are affordable and available to those households (i.e., affordable units not occupied by higher income households). In addition, we provide a calculation of the number of these units affordable and available for every 100 households in each income category.  All data in this section come from NLIHC’s tabulations of 2008-2012 Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) data. 

2.    State-Level Renter StatisticsThis section features data from the 2014 American Community Survey (ACS) describing the severe housing cost burden for renters in each income category. This section also highlights data on the absolute surplus or deficit of units affordable to renter households, as well as units that are affordable and available to those households. The number of these units affordable and available for every 100 households in each income category is calculated for the state.

3.    Regional Rental Affordability StatisticsOut of Reach data for Fair Market Rent (FMR) areas partially or wholly included in the Congressional District borders. Areas are listed here if the district encompasses even a small portion of the FMR area, and they are ranked in descending order by the number of renter households. Advocates should become familiar with the Congressional District and emphasize data for the areas most relevant to the conversation at hand. Due to space limitations only the six largest FMR areas are displayed here, but data for additional areas, as well as an explanation of the data sources and methodology, are available on the Out of Reach main page.

For more information or help using the Congressional District Housing Profiles, contact Andrew Aurand, Vice President for Research at aaurand@nlihc.org or 202.662.1530 x245.

Click on a state name below to access its Congressional District Housing Profile.

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